by Paul Frith An often over-looked offering from Hammer Film Productions, Fanatic (AKA Die! Die! My Darling: 1965) holds a unique position in the studio’s history as it represents the first, and only, of their 1960s cycle of psychological thrillers to be shot in colour. The film stars Tallulah Bankhead in her final screen […]

by Dr Carolyn Rickards, Research Associate. A review in Kinematograph Weekly from early 1959 heralded the release of a new British animated film: ‘three little men go to an island – their names are Truth, Good and Beauty.  They argue, the film enters the realm of the fantastic as they try to impress each other. […]

By Sarah Street, Principal Investigator Prism, a new play by Terry Johnson (Hampstead Theatre, London, 6 Sept-14 Oct 2017), is based on legendary colour cinematographer Jack Cardiff (Robert Lindsay) towards the end of his life, when past and present become intertwined through the effects of Alzheimer’s disease and as he struggles to write his autobiography. […]

By Keith M. Johnston, co-investigator In my last post – on special effects and early Eastman Colour – I commented on the fact that science fiction films have long been associated with a display of spectacular visual effects. But that got me thinking – while colour cinema has also been associated with spectacle, the dominant […]

by Keith M. Johnston, Co-Investigator on The Eastmancolor Revolution Project Special or visual effects have been a crucial part of cinema over the last 120 years, including George Melies’ spectacular fantasies, the stop motion animation of King Kong (1933), the motion controlled action of Star Wars (1977), and the current use of computer generated imagery […]