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Threads of Colour and Meaning in the film work of Nicolas Roeg and Anthony Richmond

by Dr Liz Watkins. University of Leeds (e.i.watkins@leeds.ac.uk) From the vibrant hue of a detail that punctuates the image to a single colour that envelopes the screen, the chromatic, in films by Nicolas Roeg, signals a greater acuity than cosmetic distraction. In Roeg’s work I would find both an attention to a central paradox of […]

Colour advertising films in British cinemas

Starting this month we will be introducing a series of guest blogs on other aspects of British cinema and colour. We’re delighted to open this series with a piece from our colleague and friend Dr Richard Farmer, who worked on the recent 1960s British cinema project (@1960sProject). As Britain became more affluent during the 1950s, […]

Richard Williams: The Artistic Animator’s Vision 

by Dr Carolyn Rickards, Research Associate. A review in Kinematograph Weekly from early 1959 heralded the release of a new British animated film: ‘three little men go to an island – their names are Truth, Good and Beauty.  They argue, the film enters the realm of the fantastic as they try to impress each other. […]

“Now on the big screen in COLOUR!” Eastman Colour and British Science Fiction films, 1955-65

By Keith M. Johnston, co-investigator In my last post – on special effects and early Eastman Colour – I commented on the fact that science fiction films have long been associated with a display of spectacular visual effects. But that got me thinking – while colour cinema has also been associated with spectacle, the dominant […]

Innovation and Experimentation Pt.3: Film Societies and the ‘Lone Worker’

by Paul Frith, Post-Doc Research Associate on The Eastmancolor Revolution Project Picking up from my previous blog (Innovation and Experimentation Pt.2, 13 July 2017) which featured the first selection of films from the Institute of Amateur Cinematographers collection to be digitised as part of The Eastmancolor Revolution project, two new titles from the collection are […]

Colour and the Critics

By Sarah Street, PI on The Eastmancolor Revolution project As we’ve seen, advertising Eastmancolor wasn’t always consistent, with less emphasis on a recognizable brand or trademark than Technicolor (‘What’s in a Name?’ Blog, 5 May 2017). This raises further issues around the varied responses of critics to colour once it became more widely available. Technicolor […]

Colour, Fantasy and the Children’s Film Foundation: The Boy Who Turned Yellow (1972)

In Cinema and Colour, Paul Coates remarks that after an extensive IMDB search, he found only 311 film titles that referenced the colour yellow compared with 2,018 for red and 1,459 for blue.[i]  To this relatively short list we can add The Boy Who Turned Yellow, a film curio that was released in 1972.  The […]