Author Archives: eastmancolourblog

Hypnosis as Spectacle in British Horror Cinema

by Dr Paul Frith The use of colour in cinematic representations of hypnosis is as old as the medium itself, often employed for the purpose of theatrical spectacle. Possibly the earliest use of hypnosis captured on film is a performance of the ‘serpentine dance’ original created by Loïe Fuller for the play Quack M.D. in […]

The Beauty Jungle: Saturation Without Depth

by Professor Sarah Street (PI). Colour was used for a number of affective purposes in films covered by the Eastmancolor project’s timeline. As Richard Farmer’s blog post of 18 January 2018 notes, colour’s increasing ubiquity in advertising attracted a multitude of arresting designs, from vibrant newspaper supplements and TV commercials to Lulu’s amazing ‘Happy Shoes’ […]

Colour and the Film Poster

In an earlier blog post I commented on the use (or different uses) of the brand ‘Eastman Colour’ within the British film industry, particularly in relation to the dominant brand identity of Technicolor. Since then, additional project research has revealed the legal agreements that Technicolor insisted on that dictated the appearance of the Technicolor brand […]

Threads of Colour and Meaning in the film work of Nicolas Roeg and Anthony Richmond

by Dr Liz Watkins. University of Leeds (e.i.watkins@leeds.ac.uk) From the vibrant hue of a detail that punctuates the image to a single colour that envelopes the screen, the chromatic, in films by Nicolas Roeg, signals a greater acuity than cosmetic distraction. In Roeg’s work I would find both an attention to a central paradox of […]

Colour Control: Chromatic Regulation in Modern Britain 1800 – 2000

Issues of subjectivity, authorship and regulation dominated the recent Colour Control workshop organised by Kirsty Sinclair Dootson (Yale University) and hosted at the Paul Mellon Centre. On a blisteringly sunny day, researchers and experts from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds converged to discuss colour within the context of British history. Dootson began proceedings with […]